sjmh sjmh - 2 months ago 14
Python Question

Python style - line continuation with strings?

In trying to obey the python style rules, I've set my editors to a max of 79 cols.

In the PEP, it recommends using python's implied continuation within brackets, parentheses and braces. However, when dealing with strings when I hit the col limit, it gets a little weird.

For instance, trying to use a multiline

mystr = """Why, hello there
wonderful stackoverflow people!"""


Will return

"Why, hello there\nwonderful stackoverflow people!"


This works:

mystr = "Why, hello there \
wonderful stackoverflow people!"


Since it returns this:

"Why, hello there wonderful stackoverflow people!"


But, when the statement is indented a few blocks in, this looks weird:

do stuff:
and more stuff:
and even some more stuff:
mystr = "Why, hello there \
wonderful stackoverflow people!"


If you try and indent the second line:

do stuff:
and more stuff:
and even some more stuff:
mystr = "Why, hello there \
wonderful stackoverflow people!"


Your string ends up as:

"Why, hello there wonderful stackoverflow people!"


The only way I've found to get around this is:

do stuff:
and more stuff:
and even some more stuff:
mystr = "Why, hello there" \
"wonderful stackoverflow people!"


Which I like better, but is also somewhat uneasy on the eyes, as it looks like there is a string just sitting in the middle of nowhere. This will produce the proper:

"Why, hello there wonderful stackoverflow people!"


So, my question is - what are some people's recommendations on how to do this and is there something I'm missing in the style guide that does show how I should be doing this?

Thanks.

Answer

Since adjacent string literals are automatically joint into a single string, you can just use the implied line continuation inside parentheses as recommended by PEP 8:

print("Why, hello there wonderful "
      "stackoverflow people!")