Landon Landon - 3 months ago 24
C++ Question

Is there a difference between foo(void) and foo() in C++ or C

Consider these two function definitions:

void foo() {}

void foo(void) {}


Is there any difference between these two? If not, why is the
void
argument there? Aesthetic reasons?

Answer

In C:
void foo() means "a function foo taking an unspecified number of arguments of unspecified type"
void foo(void) means "a function foo taking no arguments"

In C++:
void foo() means "a function foo taking no arguments"
void foo(void) means "a function foo taking no arguments"

By writing foo(void), therefore, we achieve the same interpretation across both languages and make our headers multilingual (though we usually need to do some more things to the headers to make them truly cross-language; namely, wrap them in an extern "C" if we're compiling C++).