Zakaria Zakaria - 4 months ago 12x
Java Question

How to loop over a Class attributes in Java?

How can I loop over a class attributes in java dynamically.

For eg :

public class MyClass
private type1 att1;
private type2 att2;
public void function()
for(var in MyClass.Attributes)


is this possible in Java?


There is no linguistic support to do what you're asking for.

You can reflectively access the members of a type at run-time using reflection (e.g. with Class.getDeclaredFields() to get an array of Field), but depending on what you're trying to do, this may not be the best solution.

See also

Related questions


Here's a simple example to show only some of what reflection is capable of doing.

import java.lang.reflect.*;

public class DumpFields {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    static <T> void inspect(Class<T> klazz) {
        Field[] fields = klazz.getDeclaredFields();
        System.out.printf("%d fields:%n", fields.length);
        for (Field field : fields) {
            System.out.printf("%s %s %s%n",

The above snippet uses reflection to inspect all the declared fields of class String; it produces the following output:

7 fields:
private final char[] value
private final int offset
private final int count
private int hash
private static final long serialVersionUID
private static final ObjectStreamField[] serialPersistentFields
public static final Comparator CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER

Effective Java 2nd Edition, Item 53: Prefer interfaces to reflection

These are excerpts from the book:

Given a Class object, you can obtain Constructor, Method, and Field instances representing the constructors, methods and fields of the class. [They] let you manipulate their underlying counterparts reflectively. This power, however, comes at a price:

  • You lose all the benefits of compile-time checking.
  • The code required to perform reflective access is clumsy and verbose.
  • Performance suffers.

As a rule, objects should not be accessed reflectively in normal applications at runtime.

There are a few sophisticated applications that require reflection. Examples include [...omitted on purpose...] If you have any doubts as to whether your application falls into one of these categories, it probably doesn't.