user1556266 user1556266 - 4 months ago 109
CSS Question

Using CSS for fade-in effect on page load

Can CSS Transitions be used to allow a text paragraph to fade-in on page load?

I really like how it looks on http://dotmailapp.com/ and would love to use a similar effect using CSS.

Note: The domain has since been purchased and no longer has the effect mentioned. An archived copy can be viewed on the Wayback Machine.

Illustration



Having this markup:

<div id="test">
<p>​This is a test</p>
</div>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


With the following CSS rule:

#test p {
opacity: 0;
margin-top: 25px;
font-size: 21px;
text-align: center;
-webkit-transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
-moz-transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
-o-transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
-ms-transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
}​


How can the transition be triggered on load?

Answer

Method 1:

If you are looking for a self-invoking transition then you should use CSS3 Animations, they aren't supported as well but this is exactly the kind of thing they were made for.

CSS

#test p {
    margin-top: 25px;
    font-size: 21px;
    text-align: center;

    -webkit-animation: fadein 2s; /* Safari, Chrome and Opera > 12.1 */
       -moz-animation: fadein 2s; /* Firefox < 16 */
        -ms-animation: fadein 2s; /* Internet Explorer */
         -o-animation: fadein 2s; /* Opera < 12.1 */
            animation: fadein 2s;
}

@keyframes fadein {
    from { opacity: 0; }
    to   { opacity: 1; }
}

/* Firefox < 16 */
@-moz-keyframes fadein {
    from { opacity: 0; }
    to   { opacity: 1; }
}

/* Safari, Chrome and Opera > 12.1 */
@-webkit-keyframes fadein {
    from { opacity: 0; }
    to   { opacity: 1; }
}

/* Internet Explorer */
@-ms-keyframes fadein {
    from { opacity: 0; }
    to   { opacity: 1; }
}

/* Opera < 12.1 */
@-o-keyframes fadein {
    from { opacity: 0; }
    to   { opacity: 1; }
}

Demo

Browser Support

All modern browsers, IE 10+: http://caniuse.com/#feat=css-animation


Method 2:

Alternatively, you can use jQuery (or plain JS, see third code block) to change the class on load:

jQuery

$("#test p").addClass("load");​

CSS

#test p {
    opacity: 0;
    font-size: 21px;
    margin-top: 25px;
    text-align: center;

    -webkit-transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
       -moz-transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
        -ms-transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
         -o-transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
            transition: opacity 2s ease-in;
}

#test p.load {
    opacity: 1;
}

Plain JS (not in demo)

document.getElementById("test").children[0].className += " load";

Demo

Browser Support

All modern browsers, IE 10+: http://caniuse.com/#feat=css-transitions


Method 3:

Or, you can use the method that .Mail uses:

jQuery

$("#test p").delay(1000).animate({ opacity: 1 }, 700);​

CSS

#test p {
    opacity: 0;
    font-size: 21px;
    margin-top: 25px;
    text-align: center;
}

Demo

Browser Support

jQuery 1.x: All modern browsers, IE 6+: http://jquery.com/browser-support/
jQuery 2.x: All modern browsers, IE 9+: http://jquery.com/browser-support/

This method is the most cross-compatible as the target browser does not need to support CSS3 transitions or animations.

Comments