RippeR RippeR - 4 months ago 8
C++ Question

Define or bind member function to 'variable like' keyword. Execution without parentheses

Is there a way to bind member function to something like member variable?

Let's say i have simple vector struct:

struct Vec3 {
int x, y, z;

Vec2 xy() const { return Vec2(x, y); }
Vec2 xz() const { return Vec2(x, z); }
Vec2 yz() const { return Vec2(y, z); }
}


Now i can use it like:

Vec3 t = { 5, 3, 2 };
Vec2 s = t.xy() + t.yz();


But is there a way i could use it like:

Vec3 t = { 5, 3, 2 };
Vec2 s = t.xy; // this here ? execute function without '()'.

Answer

While C++ does not offer properties by default, you can implement them pretty easily by yourself. Here is a simplistic approach:

#include <functional>

template<typename T>
struct property
{
public:
  typedef std::function<T()> getter;
  typedef std::function<void(T)> setter;

public:
  property(getter get, setter set)
  : get_(get)
  , set_(set)
  { }

  operator T() const { return get_(); }
  property& operator=(T x) { set_(x); return *this; }

private:
  getter get_;
  setter set_;
};

We can now rewrite your Vec3 class using these 'properties':

class Vec3
{
public:
  Vec3(int vx, int vy, int vz)
  : x(std::bind(&Vec3::get_x, this), std::bind(&Vec3::set_x, this, std::placeholders::_1))
  , y(std::bind(&Vec3::get_y, this), std::bind(&Vec3::set_y, this, std::placeholders::_1))
  , z(std::bind(&Vec3::get_z, this), std::bind(&Vec3::set_z, this, std::placeholders::_1))
  , xy(std::bind(&Vec3::get_xy, this), std::bind(&Vec3::set_xy, this, std::placeholders::_1))
  , xz(std::bind(&Vec3::get_xz, this), std::bind(&Vec3::set_xz, this, std::placeholders::_1))
  , yz(std::bind(&Vec3::get_yz, this), std::bind(&Vec3::set_yz, this, std::placeholders::_1))
  , x_(vx)
  , y_(vy)
  , z_(vz)
  { }

  property<int> x;
  property<int> y;
  property<int> z;

  property<Vec2> xy;
  property<Vec2> xz;
  property<Vec2> yz;

protected:
  int get_x() { return x_; }
  void set_x(int x) { x_ = x; }

  int get_y() { return y_; }
  void set_y(int y) { y_ = y; }

  int get_z() { return z_; }
  void set_z(int z) { z_ = z; }

  Vec2 get_xy() { return { x_, y_ }; }
  void set_xy(Vec2 xy) { x_ = xy.x; y_ = xy.y; }

  Vec2 get_xz() { return { x_, z_ }; }
  void set_xz(Vec2 xz) { x_ = xz.x; z_ = xz.y; }

  Vec2 get_yz() { return { y_, z_ }; }
  void set_yz(Vec2 yz) { y_ = yz.x; z_ = yz.y; }

private:
  int x_, y_, z_;
};

Which can be used like this:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Vec2& v2)
{
  out << '[' << v2.x << ", " << v2.y << ']';
  return out;
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Vec3& v3)
{
  out << '[' << v3.x << ", " << v3.y << ", " << v3.z << ']';
  return out;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  Vec3 v3 { 2, 0, 1 };
  std::cout << v3 << std::endl;
  v3.y = 3;
  std::cout << v3.xy << std::endl;
  std::cout << v3.xz << std::endl;
  std::cout << v3.yz << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

As you can see, what you are asking is possible, it just requires a lot of code.

See the live example on ideone