PowerKiKi PowerKiKi - 2 months ago 28
C# Question

Localization of DisplayNameAttribute

I am looking for a way to localize properties names displayed in a PropertyGrid. The property's name may be "overriden" using the DisplayNameAttribute attribute. Unfortunately attributes can not have non constant expressions. So I can not use strongly typed resources such as:

class Foo
{
[DisplayAttribute(Resources.MyPropertyNameLocalized)] // do not compile
string MyProperty {get; set;}
}


I had a look around and found some suggestion to inherit from DisplayNameAttribute to be able to use resource. I would end up up with code like:

class Foo
{
[MyLocalizedDisplayAttribute("MyPropertyNameLocalized")] // not strongly typed
string MyProperty {get; set;}
}


However I lose strongly typed resource benefits which is definitely not a good thing. Then I came across DisplayNameResourceAttribute which may be what I'm looking for. But it's supposed to be in Microsoft.VisualStudio.Modeling.Design namespace and I can't find what reference I am supposed to add for this namespace.

Anybody know if there's a easier way to achieve DisplayName localization in a good way ? or if there is as way to use what Microsoft seems to be using for Visual Studio ?

Answer

Here is the solution I ended up with in a separate assembly (called "Common" in my case):

   [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Property | AttributeTargets.Event)]
   public class DisplayNameLocalizedAttribute : DisplayNameAttribute
   {
      public DisplayNameLocalizedAttribute(Type resourceManagerProvider, string resourceKey)
         : base(Utils.LookupResource(resourceManagerProvider, resourceKey))
      {
      }
   }

with the code to look up the resource:

  internal static string LookupResource(Type resourceManagerProvider, string resourceKey)
  {
     foreach (PropertyInfo staticProperty in  resourceManagerProvider.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.NonPublic))
     {
        if (staticProperty.PropertyType == typeof(System.Resources.ResourceManager))
        {
           System.Resources.ResourceManager resourceManager = (System.Resources.ResourceManager)staticProperty.GetValue(null, null);
           return resourceManager.GetString(resourceKey);
        }
     }

     return resourceKey; // Fallback with the key name
  }

Typical usage would be:

class Foo
{
      [Common.DisplayNameLocalized(typeof(Resources.Resource), "CreationDateDisplayName"),
      Common.DescriptionLocalized(typeof(Resources.Resource), "CreationDateDescription")]
      public DateTime CreationDate
      {
         get;
         set;
      }
}

What is pretty much ugly as I use literal strings for resource key. Using a constant there would mean to modify Resources.Designer.cs which is probably not a good idea.

Conclusion: I am not happy with that, but I am even less happy about Microsoft who can't provide anything useful for such a common task.