ravichandra ravichandra -4 years ago 227
Java Question

Junit Testing JNDI InitialContext outside the application server

Context context = new InitialContext();
dataSource = (DataSource) context.lookup("java:comp/env/jdbc/multiDS");
connection = dataSource.getConnection();


Please help me to mock the above code.

Hi Tom Anderson

I tried the below code

@BeforeClass
public static void setUpClass() throws Exception {
// rcarver - setup the jndi context and the datasource
try {
// Create initial context
System.setProperty(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY,
"org.apache.naming.java.javaURLContextFactory");
System.setProperty(Context.URL_PKG_PREFIXES,
"org.apache.naming");
Context ic = new InitialContext();

ic.createSubcontext("java:");
ic.createSubcontext("java:comp");
ic.createSubcontext("java:comp/env");
ic.createSubcontext("java:comp/env/jdbc");
ic.createSubcontext("java:comp/env/jdbc/multiDS");
// Construct DataSource
OracleConnectionPoolDataSource ds = new OracleConnectionPoolDataSource();
ds.setURL("jdbc:oracle:thin:@g9u0696.houston.hp.com:1525:CRNAD");
ds.setUser("uname");
ds.setPassword("pwd");
} catch (NamingException ex) {
ex.printStackTrace();
}
}


But its giving error as:

com.hp.corona.common.exception.CacheException: org.apache.naming.NamingContext cannot be cast to javax.sql.DataSource


Please help me to test the code i just want connection from JNDI datasource

Answer Source

The orthodox thing to do here would be to change you code so that the Context is injected into it (by a dependency injection framework, or manually). Then, you simply pass in a mock in your unit test.

If you can't do this, and your code must create the IntialContext itself, then you will need to set up a fake JNDI implementation into which you can inject mocks. If you search the web for "in-memory JNDI implementation" or "mock JNDI implementation", you will find various options, or you could write one yourself. Basically, you will need an implementation of InitialContextFactory which simply returns a suitable mock, which you then select by setting the java.naming.factory.initial system property.

I had a crack at writing the necessary classes. Here you go:

public class MockInitialContextFactory implements InitialContextFactory {

    private static final ThreadLocal<Context> currentContext = new ThreadLocal<Context>();

    @Override
    public Context getInitialContext(Hashtable<?, ?> environment) throws NamingException {
        return currentContext.get();
    }

    public static void setCurrentContext(Context context) {
        currentContext.set(context);
    }

    public static void clearCurrentContext() {
        currentContext.remove();
    }

}

public class MockInitialContextRule implements TestRule {

    private final Context context;

    private MockInitialContextRule(Context context) {
        this.context = context;
    }

    @Override
    public Statement apply(final Statement base, Description description) {
        return new Statement() {
            @Override
            public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
                System.setProperty(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, MockInitialContextFactory.class.getName());
                MockInitialContextFactory.setCurrentContext(context);
                try {
                    base.evaluate();
                } finally {
                    System.clearProperty(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY);
                    MockInitialContextFactory.clearCurrentContext();
                }
            }
        };
    }
}

Use as follows:

public class FooTest {

    private final Context context = mock(Context.class);

    @Rule
    public MockInitialContextRule mockInitialContextRule = new MockInitialContextRule(context);

    @Test
    public void testName() throws Exception {
        // set up stubbings on the context mock
        // invoke the code under test
    }
}
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