Nikwin Nikwin - 3 months ago 22
Python Question

Is using eval in Python a bad practice?

I am using the following class to easily store data of my songs.

class Song:
"""The class to store the details of each song"""
attsToStore=('Name', 'Artist', 'Album', 'Genre', 'Location')
def __init__(self):
for att in self.attsToStore:
exec 'self.%s=None'%(att.lower()) in locals()
def setDetail(self, key, val):
if key in self.attsToStore:
exec 'self.%s=val'%(key.lower()) in locals()


I feel that this is just much more extensible than writing out an if/else block. However, eval seems to be considered a bad practice and unsafe to use. If so, can anyone explain to me why and show me a better way of defining the above class?

Answer

Yes, using eval is a bad practice. Just to name a few reasons:

  1. There is almost always a better way to do it
  2. Very dangerous and insecure
  3. Makes debugging difficult
  4. Slow

In your case you can use setattr instead:

class Song:
    """The class to store the details of each song"""
    attsToStore=('Name', 'Artist', 'Album', 'Genre', 'Location')
    def __init__(self):
        for att in self.attsToStore:
            setattr(self, att.lower(), None)
    def setDetail(self, key, val):
        if key in self.attsToStore:
            setattr(self, key.lower(), val)

EDIT:

There are some cases where you have to use eval or exec. But they are rare. Using eval in your case is a bad practice for sure. I'm emphasizing on bad practice because eval and exec are frequently used in the wrong place.

EDIT 2:

It looks like some disagree that eval is 'very dangerous and insecure' in the OP case. That might be true for this specific case but not in general. The question was general and the reasons I listed are true for the general case as well.

EDIT 3: Reordered point 1 and 4