algoProg algoProg - 2 months ago 28
C++ Question

c++ reading argv into unsigned char fixed size: Segmentation fault

I am trying to read command line argument into a fixed size unsigned char array. I get segmentation fault.

My code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <memory.h>

unsigned char key[16]={};

int main(int argc, char** argv){
std::cout << "Hello!" << std::endl;
long a = atol(argv[1]);
std::cout << a << std::endl;
memcpy(key, (unsigned char*) a, sizeof key);
// std::cout << sizeof key << std::endl;
// for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++)
// std::cout << (int) (key[i]) << std::endl;
return 0;
}


What am I doing wrong?

To call the program:

compile:
g++ main.cpp


Execute:
./a.out 128

Answer

You get SEGV because your address is wrong: you convert a value to an address. Plus the size is the one of the destination, should be the size of the source

The compiler issues a warning, that's never good, you should take it into account because that was exactly your error:

xxx.c:12:38: warning: cast to pointer from integer of different size [-Wint-to-pointer-cast]

     memcpy(key, (unsigned char*) a, sizeof key);
                                  ^

fix that like this:

memcpy(key, &a, sizeof(a));

BTW you don't have to declare key with 16 bytes. It would be safer to allocate it like this:

unsigned char key[sizeof(long)];

and when you print the bytes, iterate until sizeof(long) too, or you'll just print trash bytes in the end.

Here's a fix proposal using uint64_t (unsigned 64-bit integer from stdint.h which gives exact control on the size), zero initialization for your key and parsing using strtoll:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <memory.h>
#include <stdint.h>

unsigned char key[sizeof(uint64_t)]={0};

int main(int argc, char** argv){
        std::cout << "Hello!" << std::endl;
        uint64_t a = strtoll(argv[1],NULL,10);
        memcpy(key, &a, sizeof a);

      for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(key); i++)
              std::cout << (int) (key[i]) << std::endl;
        return 0;
}

(if you want to handle signed, just change to int64_t)

Test on a little endian architecture:

% a 10000000000000
Hello!
0
160
114
78
24
9
0
0