firstaccount firstaccount - 21 days ago 4
reST (reStructuredText) Question

How to call the function in derived class to process handle_post?(Function call missing argument list to create pointer)

in my base class, this is a public non-static member function:

void BaseClass::SetPorcessMethod()
//do something, this->HandlePost);
//do something

In the function above,
is a static member variable.
is a pure virtual function which is implemented by all derived classes. I want to use
pointer to call different
from different derived class.

class BaseClass
static http_listener listener;
void SetPorcessMethod();
virtual void HandlePost((http_request request) = 0;
/*listener is init in constructor , not display here*/
class Derived2:public BaseClass
void HandlePost(http_request request);
class Derived1:public BaseClass
void HandlePost(http_request request);

Derived1 instance1;
Derived2 instance2;

However, it displays
BaseClass::HandlePost:function call missing argument list use &BaseClass::HandlePost:function to create a pointer to member
.I know this is because
Your code attempts to pass a pointer-to-member-function, which cannot be converted to a pointer-to-function. This is because a pointer-to-member-function can only be called on an object, so it wouldn't know what object to use.
Function call missing argument list to create pointer
But what should I do so that I can call the function from derived class with


You are trying to pass a member function to support. In order to call such a function the caller need the member function arguments and the pointer to the instance to call the function on.

However support expects a std::function<void(http_request)>, i.e. without the instance pointer. So you have to wrap the call into another callable which does not need to have the BaseClass instance pointer passed. You can do that with a lambda (or std::bind if you prefer): methods::POST,
    [this](http_request request){return HandlePost(request);} ); methods::POST,
    std::bind(&HandlePost, this, std::placeholders::_1) );

#include<functional> for the latter variant.