ovhaag ovhaag - 6 months ago 18
Ruby Question

Ruby inject with index and brackets

I try to clean my Code. The first Version uses

each_with_index
. In the second version I tried to compact the code with the
Enumerable.inject_with_index-construct
, that I found here.

It works now, but seems to me as obscure as the first code.
Add even worse I don't understand the brackets around element,index in

.. .inject(groups) do |group_container, (element,index)|


but they are necessary


  • What is the use of these brackets?

  • How can I make the code clear and readable?



FIRST VERSION -- WITH "each_with_index"



class Array

# splits as good as possible to groups of same size
# elements are sorted. I.e. low elements go to the first group,
# and high elements to the last group
#
# the default for number_of_groups is 4
# because the intended use case is
# splitting statistic data in 4 quartiles
#
# a = [1, 8, 7, 5, 4, 2, 3, 8]
# a.sorted_in_groups(3) # => [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 7], [8, 8]]
#
# b = [[7, 8, 9], [4, 5, 7], [2, 8]]
# b.sorted_in_groups(2) {|sub_ary| sub_ary.sum } # => [ [[2, 8], [4, 5, 7]], [[7, 8, 9]] ]
def sorted_in_groups(number_of_groups = 4)
groups = Array.new(number_of_groups) { Array.new }
return groups if size == 0

average_group_size = size.to_f / number_of_groups.to_f
sorted = block_given? ? self.sort_by {|element| yield(element)} : self.sort

sorted.each_with_index do |element, index|
group_number = (index.to_f / average_group_size).floor
groups[group_number] << element
end

groups
end
end


SECOND VERSION -- WITH "inject" AND index



class Array
def sorted_in_groups(number_of_groups = 4)
groups = Array.new(number_of_groups) { Array.new }
return groups if size == 0

average_group_size = size.to_f / number_of_groups.to_f
sorted = block_given? ? self.sort_by {|element| yield(element)} : self.sort

sorted.each_with_index.inject(groups) do |group_container, (element,index)|
group_number = (index.to_f / average_group_size).floor
group_container[group_number] << element
group_container
end
end
end

Answer

What is the use of these brackets?

It's a very nice feature of ruby. I call it "destructuring array assignment", but it probably has an official name too.

Here's how it works. Let's say you have an array

arr = [1, 2, 3]

Then you assign this array to a list of names, like this:

a, b, c = arr
a # => 1
b # => 2
c # => 3

You see, the array was "destructured" into its individual elements. Now, to the each_with_index. As you know, it's like a regular each, but also returns an index. inject doesn't care about all this, it takes input elements and passes them to its block as is. If input element is an array (elem/index pair from each_with_index), then we can either take it apart in the block body

sorted.each_with_index.inject(groups) do |group_container, pair|
  element, index = pair

  # or
  # element = pair[0]
  # index = pair[1]

  # rest of your code
end

Or destructure that array right in the block signature. Parentheses there are necessary to give ruby a hint that this is a single parameter that needs to be split in several.

Hope this helps.