leizh00701 leizh00701 - 6 months ago 77
iOS Question

Two way binding in RxSwift

I read the two way binding operator in sample code of RxSwift.

func <-> <T>(property: ControlProperty<T>, variable: Variable<T>) -> Disposable {
let bindToUIDisposable = variable.asObservable()
.bindTo(property)
let bindToVariable = property
.subscribe(onNext: { n in
variable.value = n
}, onCompleted: {
bindToUIDisposable.dispose()
})

return StableCompositeDisposable.create(bindToUIDisposable, bindToVariable)
}


When
property
changed, it will notify variable, and set the variable's value, while the variable's value is set, it will notify the property. I think it will lead to endless loop...

Answer

Thanks for raising the question, I spent some time digging around the ControlProperty implementation (note I've added a .debug() call to trace the values generated for control property).

public struct ControlProperty<PropertyType> : ControlPropertyType {
    public typealias E = PropertyType

    let _values: Observable<PropertyType>
    let _valueSink: AnyObserver<PropertyType>

    public init<V: ObservableType, S: ObserverType where E == V.E, E == S.E>(values: V, valueSink: S) {
        _values = values.debug("Control property values").subscribeOn(ConcurrentMainScheduler.instance)
        _valueSink = valueSink.asObserver()
    }

    public func on(event: Event<E>) {
        switch event {
        case .Error(let error):
            bindingErrorToInterface(error)
        case .Next:
            _valueSink.on(event)
        case .Completed:
            _valueSink.on(event)
        }
    }
}

My test setup was as following, I've removed all views positioning here to make it shorter:

import UIKit
import RxSwift
import RxCocoa
class ViewController: UIViewController {
    let variable = Variable<Bool>(false);
    let bag = DisposeBag();

    override func loadView() {
        super.loadView()

        let aSwitch = UISwitch();
        view.addSubview(aSwitch)

        (aSwitch.rx_value <-> variable).addDisposableTo(bag);

        let button = UIButton();
        button.rx_tap.subscribeNext { [weak self] in
            self?.variable.value = true;
        }.addDisposableTo(bag)
        view.addSubview(button);
    }
 }

infix operator <-> {
}

func <-> <T>(property: ControlProperty<T>, variable: Variable<T>) -> Disposable{
    let bindToUIDisposable = variable.asObservable().debug("Variable values in bind")
    .bindTo(property)

    let bindToVariable = property
        .debug("Property values in bind")
        .subscribe(onNext: { n in
            variable.value = n
            }, onCompleted:  {
                 bindToUIDisposable.dispose()
        })

    return StableCompositeDisposable.create(bindToUIDisposable, bindToVariable)
 }

Now to the results. First we try tapping the button, which should set the variable to true. This triggers on(event: Event<E>) on ControlProperty and sets the switch value to true.

2016-05-28 12:24:33.229: Variable values in bind -> Event Next(true)

// value flow
value assigned to Variable -> 
Variable emits event -> 
ControlProperty receives event -> 
value assigned to underlying control property (e.g. `on` for `UISwitch`)

Next lets trigger the switch itself. So as we can see, the control generated an event as a result of UIControlEventValueChanged which was passed through _values on ControlProperty, and then its value got assigned to Variable value as in example above. But there's no loop, since update to the Variable value doesn't trigger a control event on the switch.

2016-05-28 12:29:01.957: Control property values -> Event Next(false)
2016-05-28 12:29:01.957: Property values in bind -> Event Next(false)
2016-05-28 12:29:01.958: Variable values in bind -> Event Next(false)

// value flow
trigger the state of control (e.g. `UISwitch`) -> 
ControlProperty emits event -> 
value assigned to Variable -> 
Variable emits event -> 
ControlProperty receives event -> 
value assigned to underlying control property (e.g. `on` for `UISwitch`)

So a simple explanation would be:

  • a value from a control is emitted once some kind of UIControlEvent is triggered
  • when a value is assigned directly to the control property, the control doesn't trigger a change event so there's no loop.

Hope it helps, sorry for a bit messy explanation - I've found it out by experiment)