ahmd0 ahmd0 - 25 days ago 4x
C# Question

Declaring a long constant byte array

I have a long byte array that I need to declare in my C# code. I do something like this:

public static class Definitions
public const byte[] gLongByteArray = new byte[] {
1, 2, 3,
//and so on

But I get an error that the const array may be initialized only with nulls.

If I change
it compiles, but the question I have is this -- when I declare it as
public static byte[] gLongByteArray
it won't be initialized every time my app loads, right? In that case the
variable will simply point to an array that is defined in the compiled exe/dll file that loads into memory. The reason I'm asking is because this array is pretty long and I don't want my program to waste CPU cycles on loading it every time the app starts, or worse, this class is referenced...


Compile-time constants (those declared with the const keyword) are severely restricted. No code must be executed to get such a constant, or otherwise it could not be a compile-time constant. const constants are static by default.

If you want to create a constant and you cannot use a compile-time constant, you can use static readonly instead:

public static readonly byte[] longByteArray = new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };

The static keyword ensures it is initialized only once, and part of the declaring type (and not each instance). The readonly keyword ensures the longByteArray variable cannot be changed afterwards.

Definitions.longByteArray = new byte[] { 4, 5, 6 };   // Not possible.

Warning: An array is mutable, so in the above code I can still do this:

Definitions.longByteArray[3] = 82;                    // Allowed.

To prevent that, make the type not an array but a read-only collection interface, such as IEnumerable<T> or IReadOnlyList<T>, or even better a read-only collection type such as ReadOnlyCollection<T> which doesn't even allow modification through casting.

public static readonly IReadOnlyList<byte> longByteArray = new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };