leo leo - 6 months ago 60
Java Question

@RequestBody and @ResponseBody annotations in Spring

Can someone explain the

@RequestBody
and
@ResponseBody
annotations in Spring 3? What are they for? Any examples would be great.

Answer

There is a whole Section in the docs called 16.3.3.4 Mapping the request body with the @RequestBody annotation. And one called 16.3.3.5 Mapping the response body with the @ResponseBody annotation. I suggest you consult those sections. Also relevant: @RequestBody javadocs, @ResponseBody javadocs

Usage examples would be something like this:

Using a JavaScript-library like JQuery, you would post a JSON-Object like this:

{ "firstName" : "Elmer", "lastName" : "Fudd" }

Your controller method would look like this:

// controller
@ResponseBody @RequestMapping("/description")
public Description getDescription(@RequestBody UserStats stats){
    return new Description(stats.getFirstName() + " " + stats.getLastname() + " hates wacky wabbits");
}

// domain / value objects
public class UserStats{
    private String firstName;
    private String lastName;
    // + getters, setters
}
public class Description{
    private String description;
    // + getters, setters, constructor
}

Now if you have Jackson on your classpath (and have an <mvc:annotation-driven> setup), Spring would convert the incoming JSON to a UserStats object from the post body (because you added the @RequestBody annotation) and it would serialize the returned object to JSON (because you added the @ResponseBody annotation). So the Browser / Client would see this JSON result:

{ "description" : "Elmer Fudd hates wacky wabbits" }

See this previous answer of mine for a complete working example: http://stackoverflow.com/a/5908632/342852

Note: RequestBody / ResponseBody is of course not limited to JSON, both can handle multiple formats, including plain text and XML, but JSON is probably the most used format.


Update: Ever since Spring 4.x, you usually won't use @RequestBody on method level, but rather @RestController on class level, with the same effect. See Creating REST Controllers with the @RestController annotation