N K N K - 5 months ago 14
SQL Question

Executing the stored procedure causes error

I have a stored procedure in which I want to get the

reportdate
while executing.

I pass one parameter to the stored procedure for executing it,. I pass it like this

exec UserReportData '10-06-2016'


but I get an error:


The conversion of a char data type to a datetime data type resulted in an out-of-range datetime value.


This is my stored procedure:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[UserReportData]
@As_ONDATE Datetime
AS
BEGIN
DECLARE @REPORTDATE datetime
--DECLARE @OPENING INT

SELECT *
INTO #temptable
FROM
(SELECT
a.CUser_id, b.User_Id, a.U_datetime AS REPORTDATE
FROM
inward_doc_tracking_trl a, user_mst b
WHERE
a.CUser_id = b.mkey
AND CONVERT(varchar(50), a.U_datetime, 103) = @As_ONDATE) AS x

DECLARE Cur_1 CURSOR FOR
SELECT CUser_id, User_Id
FROM #temptable

OPEN Cur_1

DECLARE @CUser_id INT
DECLARE @User_Id INT

FETCH NEXT FROM Cur_1 INTO @CUser_id, @User_Id

WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0)
BEGIN
SELECT CONVERT(varchar(50), U_datetime, 103)
FROM inward_doc_tracking_trl
WHERE CONVERT(varchar(50), U_datetime, 103) = @As_ONDATE

UPDATE #temptable
SET REPORTDATE = @REPORTDATE
WHERE CUser_id = @CUser_id
AND User_Id = @User_Id

FETCH NEXT FROM Cur_1 INTO @CUser_id, @User_Id
END

CLOSE Cur_1
DEALLOCATE Cur_1

SELECT * FROM #temptable

DROP TABLE #temptable
END


Kindly help me know what is the cause of the error.

Answer

The various settings (language, date format) only influence how the DateTime is shown to you in SQL Server Management Studio - or how it is parsed when you attempt to convert a string to a DateTime.

There are many formats supported by SQL Server - see the MSDN Books Online on CAST and CONVERT. Most of those formats are dependent on what settings you have - therefore, these settings might work some times - and sometimes not.

The way to solve this is to use the (slightly adapted) ISO-8601 date format that is supported by SQL Server - this format works always - regardless of your SQL Server language and dateformat settings.

The ISO-8601 format is supported by SQL Server comes in two flavors:

  • YYYYMMDD for just dates (no time portion); note here: no dashes!, that's very important! YYYY-MM-DD is NOT independent of the dateformat settings in your SQL Server and will NOT work in all situations!

or:

  • YYYY-MM-DDTHH:MM:SS for dates and times - note here: this format has dashes (but they can be omitted), and a fixed T as delimiter between the date and time portion of your DATETIME.

This is valid for SQL Server 2000 and newer.

If you use SQL Server 2008 or newer and the DATE datatype (only DATE - not DATETIME!), then you can indeed also use the YYYY-MM-DD format and that will work, too, with any settings in your SQL Server.

Don't ask me why this whole topic is so tricky and somewhat confusing - that's just the way it is. But with the YYYYMMDD format, you should be fine for any version of SQL Server and for any language and dateformat setting in your SQL Server.

The recommendation for SQL Server 2008 and newer is to use DATE if you only need the date portion, and DATETIME2(n) when you need both date and time. You should try to start phasing out the DATETIME datatype if ever possible

So in your concrete case - just change how you call your stored procedure to:

exec UserReportData '20160610'    -- 10th of June, 2016

or

exec UserReportData '20161006'    -- 6th of October, 2016 

depending on whether this was the 6th October or the 10th June of 2016 you're interested in ...

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