gong-ui jang gong-ui jang - 6 days ago 4
C++ Question

count distinct slices in an array

I was trying to solve this problem.


An integer M and a non-empty zero-indexed array A consisting of N
non-negative integers are given. All integers in array A are less than
or equal to M.

A pair of integers (P, Q), such that 0 ≤ P ≤ Q < N, is called a slice
of array A. The slice consists of the elements A[P], A[P + 1], ...,
A[Q]. A distinct slice is a slice consisting of only unique numbers.
That is, no individual number occurs more than once in the slice.

For example, consider integer M = 6 and array A such that:

A[0] = 3
A[1] = 4
A[2] = 5
A[3] = 5
A[4] = 2


There are exactly nine distinct slices: (0, 0), (0, 1), (0, 2), (1,
1), (1,2), (2, 2), (3, 3), (3, 4) and (4, 4).

The goal is to calculate the number of distinct slices.


Thanks in advance.

#include <algorithm>
#include <cstring>
#include <cmath>
#define MAX 100002

// you can write to stdout for debugging purposes, e.g.
// cout << "this is a debug message" << endl;

using namespace std;

bool check[MAX];

int solution(int M, vector<int> &A) {
memset(check, false, sizeof(check));
int base = 0;
int fibot = 0;
int sum = 0;

while(fibot < A.size()){

if(check[A[fibot]]){
base = fibot;
}

check[A[fibot]] = true;

sum += fibot - base + 1;
fibot += 1;
}

return min(sum, 1000000000);
}

Answer

The solution is not correct because your algorithm is wrong.

First of all, let me show you a counter example. Let A = {2, 1, 2}. The first iteration: base = 0, fibot = 0, sum += 1. That's right. The second one: base = 0, fibot = 1, sum += 2. That's correct, too. The last step: fibot = 2, check[A[fibot]] is true, thus, base = 2. But it should be 1. So your code returns1 + 2 + 1 = 4 while the right answer 1 + 2 + 2 = 5.

The right way to do it could be like this: start with L = 0. For each R from 0 to n - 1, keep moving the L to the right until the subarray contais only distinct values (you can maintain the number of occurrences of each value in an array and use the fact that A[R] is the only element that can occur more than once).

There is one more issue with your code: the sum variable may overflow if int is 32-bit type on the testing platform (for instance, if all elements of A are distinct).

As for the question WHY your algorithm is incorrect, I have no idea why it should be correct in the first place. Can you prove it? The base = fibot assignment looks quite arbitrary to me.