NaMa NaMa - 25 days ago 5x
C++ Question

Assignment of values to class objects in C++

I am sorry if it is duplicated question, but i didn't find a discussion of exactly this question. So, i am learning C++ and i don't understand the following issue with the assignment of values to class objects. I have this implementation of the class T:

class T
int aInt;
double aDouble;


T(int my_aInt, double my_aDouble):aInt(my_aInt), aDouble(my_aDouble){}

T(int my_aInt):aInt(my_aInt), aDouble(0.){}

T(double my_aDouble):aInt(0), aDouble(my_aDouble){}

void set_aInt(int my_aInt){
aInt = my_aInt;

void set_aDouble(double my_aDouble){
aDouble = my_aDouble;

int get_aInt(){
return aInt;

double get_aDouble(){
return aDouble;

I want to create the objects of this class and assign some values to them. I can do it in this way:

T tt1(-1, 5.), tt2(-1), tt3(5.);

and it works fine. Now i want to change the values assign to object tt1. I know that i can do it like this:

tt1.set_aInt(-3); // gives aInt = -3, aDouble = 0
tt1.set_aDouble(6.); // gives aInt = 0, aDouble = 6.

and it also works fine. But it seems there is another way to do it:

tt1 = -3; // gives aInt = -3, aDouble = 0
tt1 = 6.; // gives aInt = 0, aDouble = 6.
tt1 = (-3, 6.); // gives aInt = 0, aDouble = 6. - Why?

My first question is: Is
tt1 = -3;
equivalent to
and is it a good practice? The second question is what is wrong with
tt1 = (-3, 6.);
and why it sets value of aInt equals to 0 instead of -3?


You should mark the single argument constructors explicit, because defining a single argument constructor also creates an implicit conversion from the argument type to the constructed type in C++, which is typically not desired.

tt1 = -3;

is thus equal to:

tt1 = T(-3);

i.e. it uses copy/move assignment. In the second case, the (-3, 6.) is just parenthesis around the statement -3, 6., where , is the sequence operator. The statement thus evaluates to 6., and the implicit conversions using the double constructor is chosen.