Andrew Andrew - 1 month ago 4x
Git Question

Git - Using multiple remotes to track the same branch and server

I am trying to set up a Git repo on a remote server of mine, that I am sharing with someone else. Only thing is, this is located in my LAN, which I am not always a part of.
I would like to be able to have 2 remotes using the same branch, all synchronized, almost like a symlink (but with configs).

To make things harder, if I try to use the external IP as a remote while in the LAN, it will fail, as that maps to my router's own internal IP.
I would like to be able to do

git push/pull lan
to push while in LAN, and
git push/pull wan
when not, and ensure neither complain about anything relating to the two of them being separate.

I would like to also ensure they use the same data for syncing between them, as the destination server is the same in either case. I have some experience with Git, but not enough to be able to do this and be sure that it will work as planned.

I do not want to try to sync both of them at once by setting 2 remote URLs for the one branch, as it will just make pushing/pulling very slow because of timeouts.

Assume I have set up LAN already, is up to date, and has an initial commit already, and WAN is not yet set up.

Say the server's internal IP is
, and the external one is
, how would I go about this?


As I commented below, one can add to a local repo as many remotes as you need:

git remote add upstream1 /url/first/repo
git remote add upstream2 /url/first/repo

Then a git push can select the right remote to use:

git push upstream1
# or
git push upstream2

The easiest would be add a script which would:

  • test for the right url (with, for instance, git ls-remote /url/to/remote/repo)
  • replace origin with the url that works in the current environment

    git remote set-url origin /url/that/works

That way, you always have just one remote to manage: the default one called 'origin'.
But each time you are switching environment, your script can update origin url.