Steven Scotten Steven Scotten - 7 months ago 39
SQL Question

Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' while attempting to grant privileges. How do I grant privileges?

I've looked at a number of similar questions and so I'm demonstrating that I've checked the basics. Though of course, that doesn't mean I haven't missed something totally obvious. :-)

My question is: why am I denied access on a user with the privileges to do what I'm trying to do and where I have already typed the password and been granted access? (For the sake of completeness, I tried typing the wrong password just to make sure that MySQL client would deny me access at program start.)

Background:

Logged in to the shell of the machine running the MySQL server via ssh, I log in as root:

[myname@host ~]$ mysql -u root -p -hlocalhost
Enter password:
Welcome to the MySQL monitor. Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 62396
Server version: 5.5.18-log MySQL Community Server (GPL)

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql>


Awesome. My reading of the answers to similar questions suggests that I should make sure the the privileges are current with what is in the grant tables

mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>


Next make sure I am who I think I am:

mysql> SELECT user();
+----------------+
| user() |
+----------------+
| root@localhost |
+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)


...and really really make sure:

mysql> SELECT current_user();
+----------------+
| current_user() |
+----------------+
| root@localhost |
+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>


So far so good. Now what privileges do I have?

mysql> SHOW GRANTS FOR 'root'@'localhost';
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Grants for root@localhost |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, CREATE, DROP, RELOAD, SHUTDOWN, PROCESS, FILE, REFERENCES, INDEX, ALTER, SHOW DATABASES, SUPER, CREATE TEMPORARY TABLES, LOCK TABLES, EXECUTE, REPLICATION SLAVE, REPLICATION CLIENT, CREATE VIEW, SHOW VIEW, CREATE ROUTINE, ALTER ROUTINE, CREATE USER, EVENT, TRIGGER ON *.* TO 'root'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY PASSWORD '[OBSCURED]' WITH GRANT OPTION |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)


Now that's a little hard to read, so lets try this way (you will also get to see that there is a non-localhost 'root' user):

mysql> SELECT * FROM mysql.user WHERE User='root'\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
Host: localhost
User: root
Password: *[OBSCURED]
Select_priv: Y
Insert_priv: Y
Update_priv: Y
Delete_priv: Y
Create_priv: Y
Drop_priv: Y
Reload_priv: Y
Shutdown_priv: Y
Process_priv: Y
File_priv: Y
Grant_priv: Y
References_priv: Y
Index_priv: Y
Alter_priv: Y
Show_db_priv: Y
Super_priv: Y
Create_tmp_table_priv: Y
Lock_tables_priv: Y
Execute_priv: Y
Repl_slave_priv: Y
Repl_client_priv: Y
Create_view_priv: Y
Show_view_priv: Y
Create_routine_priv: Y
Alter_routine_priv: Y
Create_user_priv: Y
Event_priv: Y
Trigger_priv: Y
ssl_type:
ssl_cipher:
x509_issuer:
x509_subject:
max_questions: 0
max_updates: 0
max_connections: 0
max_user_connections: 0
*************************** 2. row ***************************
Host: [HOSTNAME].com
User: root
Password: *[OBSCURED]
Select_priv: Y
Insert_priv: Y
Update_priv: Y
Delete_priv: Y
Create_priv: Y
Drop_priv: Y
Reload_priv: Y
Shutdown_priv: Y
Process_priv: Y
File_priv: Y
Grant_priv: Y
References_priv: Y
Index_priv: Y
Alter_priv: Y
Show_db_priv: Y
Super_priv: Y
Create_tmp_table_priv: Y
Lock_tables_priv: Y
Execute_priv: Y
Repl_slave_priv: Y
Repl_client_priv: Y
Create_view_priv: Y
Show_view_priv: Y
Create_routine_priv: Y
Alter_routine_priv: Y
Create_user_priv: Y
Event_priv: Y
Trigger_priv: Y
ssl_type:
ssl_cipher:
x509_issuer:
x509_subject:
max_questions: 0
max_updates: 0
max_connections: 0
max_user_connections: 0
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)


Awesome! MySQL thinks that I am root@localhost and root@localhost has all those privileges. That means I ought to be able to do what I want, right?

mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'steves'@'[hostname].com' IDENTIFIED BY '[OBSCURED]' WITH GRANT OPTION;
ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES)


How could I have screwed up something this basic?

Side note: for anyone who wants to suggest that I not have a user named root with all privileges, that's great and something I'll consider doing once I can give another user some privileges.

Thank you!

Answer

Notice how the output of

SHOW GRANTS FOR 'root'@'localhost';

did not say 'ALL PRIVILEGES' but had to spell out what root@localhost has.

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES will fail, because a user can not grant what he/she does not have, and the server seem to think something is not here ...

Now, what's missing then ?

On my system, I get this:

mysql> select version();
+------------+
| version()  |
+------------+
| 5.5.21-log |
+------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SHOW GRANTS FOR 'root'@'localhost';
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Grants for root@localhost                                           |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'root'@'localhost' WITH GRANT OPTION |
| GRANT PROXY ON ''@'' TO 'root'@'localhost' WITH GRANT OPTION        |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT * FROM mysql.user WHERE User='root' and Host='localhost'\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
                  Host: localhost
                  User: root
              Password: 
           Select_priv: Y
           Insert_priv: Y
           Update_priv: Y
           Delete_priv: Y
           Create_priv: Y
             Drop_priv: Y
           Reload_priv: Y
         Shutdown_priv: Y
          Process_priv: Y
             File_priv: Y
            Grant_priv: Y
       References_priv: Y
            Index_priv: Y
            Alter_priv: Y
          Show_db_priv: Y
            Super_priv: Y
 Create_tmp_table_priv: Y
      Lock_tables_priv: Y
          Execute_priv: Y
       Repl_slave_priv: Y
      Repl_client_priv: Y
      Create_view_priv: Y
        Show_view_priv: Y
   Create_routine_priv: Y
    Alter_routine_priv: Y
      Create_user_priv: Y
            Event_priv: Y
          Trigger_priv: Y
Create_tablespace_priv: Y <----------------------------- new column in 5.5
              ssl_type: 
            ssl_cipher: 
           x509_issuer: 
          x509_subject: 
         max_questions: 0
           max_updates: 0
       max_connections: 0
  max_user_connections: 0
                plugin: <------------------------------- new column in 5.5
 authentication_string: <------------------------------- new column in 5.5
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

There are also new tables in 5.5, such as mysql.proxies_user: make sure you have them.

When installing a brand new mysql server instance, the install script will create all the mysql.* tables with the proper structure.

When upgrading from an old version, make sure the proper upgrade procedure (mysql_upgrade) is used, which will add the missing tables / columns.

It is only a guess, but it seems mysql_upgrade was not done for this instance, causing the behavior seen.