nooga nooga - 3 months ago 12
C++ Question

C++ error: 'inline' can only appear on functions

I'm trying to compile VCMI under OS X 10.7 using clang++.

I configured project with

CXX=clang++
because Apple's gcc didn't seem to recognize required
-std=c++0x
flag.

I've added
-stdlib=libc++
to
CXXFLAGS
because without that clang wasn't even able to find
#include <array>
.

Currently i've got:
CXXFLAGS= -std=c++0x -stdlib=libc++ -Wall -Wextra -Wcast-align -Wpointer-arith -Wno-switch -Wno-sign-compare -Wno-unused-parameter -Wc++11-extensions


The problem is that I get following errors:

clang: warning: treating 'c-header' input as 'c++-header' when in C++ mode, this behavior is deprecated
clang: warning: argument unused during compilation: '-ggdb'
StdInc.h:1:9: warning: #pragma once in main file
#pragma once
^
In file included from StdInc.h:3:
In file included from ./../Global.h:32:
In file included from /usr/bin/../lib/c++/v1/algorithm:594:
In file included from /usr/bin/../lib/c++/v1/memory:596:
/usr/bin/../lib/c++/v1/iterator:1696:1: error: 'inline' can only appear on functions
inline _LIBCPP_INLINE_VISIBILITY
^
/usr/bin/../lib/c++/v1/iterator:1698:1: error: variable 'begin' declared as a template
begin(_T (&__array)[_N])
^
/usr/bin/../lib/c++/v1/iterator:1698:12: error: use of undeclared identifier '__array'
begin(_T (&__array)[_N])
^
./../tchar_amigaos4.h:157:16: note: expanded from macro '_T'
#define _T(x) x
^
In file included from StdInc.h:3:
In file included from ./../Global.h:32:
In file included from /usr/bin/../lib/c++/v1/algorithm:594:
In file included from /usr/bin/../lib/c++/v1/memory:596:
/usr/bin/../lib/c++/v1/iterator:1698:25: error: expected ';' at end of declaration
begin(_T (&__array)[_N])
^
;
/usr/bin/../lib/c++/v1/iterator:1699:1: error: expected unqualified-id
{
^
1 warning and 5 errors generated.


I must admit that I've never saw anything like this. These are in libc++ sources!
Does anybody know what may be the cause?

Answer

Your issue is here:

./../tchar_amigaos4.h:157:16: note: expanded from macro '_T'
#define _T(x)           x

Defining a macro named _T in your code, then including standard headers, is undefined behavior, strictly speaking.

IIRC, newer versions of libc++ avoid the use of the name _T in particular because people tend to screw this up, so you might want to try upgrading to the newest version of the command-line tools.

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